James Harvey...

Family Surnames

The following appendix lists some of the direct family surnames in the Harvey ancestry, as well as surnames of their children.

Purton

Recorded in several forms including Parton, Perton, Purton, Pearton, Piertin, and Pyrton, this is an Anglo-Scottish surname.  It is locational from any of the various places in England named from the Olde English pre 7th century word "pere" meaning pear, and "tun", an enclosure or orchard, or for a few name holders from the parish of Parton on the river Dee, North West of Castle Douglas in Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland.  This gets its name from the Gaelic word "portan", a diminutive of "port", meaning landing-place.  The English places include: Parton, a parish north of Whitehaven in Cumberland; the hamlet of Parton near Wigton in Cumberland; Parton (Cross) near Kington in Herefordshire; and Parton in Gloucestershire.  Locational surnames, such as this, were originally given either to the lord of the manor, or more especially as a means of identification to those who left their birthplace to settle elsewhere.

Tudhope

This interesting surname is of Gaelic and Olde English origins, and is locational. It describes a former resident of a now "lost" place called Tudhope, which translates as "the small enclosed valley (hop) of Tudda's tribe". The recordings suggest that "Tudhop (e)" was near Jedburgh in Roxburgh (which borders Lanarkshire) and this is probable as all early registrations are from the border region of South Scotland.  The name has been found under a wide variety of spellings as shown below. This is quite normal, because when an original placename, for whatever reason, disappears off the map, the "link" is then lost. These early developments include Alexander Tutope of Crocefuird in 1622, William Tuttup of Nether Affleck in 1665, whilst one James Towdop (as spelt) was ordered before the Privy Council of Scotland in 1627 as a masterless person suitable for war duties.  In tracing the family tree, other spellings used by ancestors over time were Tytop and Tutip.  The ancestor James Tutip born in 1687, married in 1703, was from in Jedburgh.

Harvey

This ancient surname, which is one of the earliest on record, is of English and Irish origin. It is also well recorded in Scotland, although the origin is as for England.  The name has two possible sources, the first being from the Breton personal name "Aeruiu" or "Haerviu", composed of the elements "haer", meaning battle, and "vy", - worthy.  The 1086 Domesday has various references to followers of William the Conqueror, including Herueu de Berruarius of Suffolk, and later Heuei de Castre of Lincoln, in 1157.  These were not surnames, although in fact the first surname recording as shown below was only just behind.  The second source is Irish, although in fact most name holders in Ireland do descend from English settlers, it is said that a Galway clan called originally the O'hAirmheadhaigh, did 'anglicise' their name to Harvey or Harvie.  The Gaelic translates as 'the descendant of the son of Airmed'.  The surname is generally recorded as Harvey, Harvie, Hervie and Hervey.

Brownlee

Recorded as Brownlea, Brownlee, Brownlie, Brownlees, and even Brunlees, this is a Scottish surname.  It originates from a place formerly known as "The lands of Brownlee", in the county of Lanarkshire, or possibly from another village called Brownlee in Ayrshire.  The meaning of the name is probably "Brun's farm", from the pre 8th century Olde English "Brun" a personal name, which developed into the surname Brown, and "legh", a fenced enclosure in the forest, suitable for agriculture, or in other words, a farm.  Later in history, there was a Barony of Brownlee.  Both Lanarkshire and Ayrshire formed part of the old kingdom of Strathclyde, which was an English dependency, and where English was the spoken language from ancient times.

Crowden

This is an English and specifically Devonian surname. It derives from a village called 'Crowden', (the valley of the crows) near the town of Okehampton, in the west part of the county. In the 20th century the surname is generally recorded as 'Crowden and Growden' throughout the county. The development of the latter form is probably as a result of overlapping local dialects, poor spelling, and even worse writing.

Ingamells

This very interesting name would seem from the first known recording to be of Italian origin, and this may well be so.  However, the elements of the name are originally Norse-Viking pre 10th Century, deriving from the personal name "Ingvarr", which translates loosely as "people-guard", plus the Italian patronymic suffix "elli", to mean "the son of Ingvarr".  Although it is commonly thought in Britain that the Viking influences were only in Northern Europe, this is not so, the Mediterranean region also coming into their sphere.

Chalcroft

This interesting name is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and can be either a topographical or a locational surname.  If the former, the surname means "the dweller at the cold croft", derived from the Olde English pre 7th Century "ceald", cold, with "croft", a paddock, an arable enclosure normally adjoining a house.  The surname from this source can be found as "Calcraft", "Chalcraft", "Chalcroft" and "Choldcroft".  The second possible meaning of the name "Calcraft" is as a variant form of the locational name "Chalcroft", which derives from the place so called in Hampshire, from the Olde English "cealf", calf, and "croft", as before.  The surname from this source may also be topographical, denoting residence by 'the calves’ croft", and can be found as "Chalcraft", "Chalcroft" and "Calcraft".

Hollyman

Recorded in a wide range of spellings, including Holman, Holtman, Holloman, Hollyman, Holyman, and the dialectal Olman and Oloman, this is an English surname.  It has at least four known origins, and there may well be others.  The first was a nickname either for a priest, or much more likely for somebody who had "priestly" manners or appearance, possibly an actor, one who played the part of a holyman in the famous travelling theatres of the Middle Ages.  The second and third possible origins are habitational or topographical and describe either a person who lived in or by a hollow, or who lived at a "holm", an island of dry ground usually in a fen or marsh.  Both are from Old English pre 7th century words 'hoh' meaning hollow plus 'man' which can simply mean a male person, but is more likely to imply a person who worked at such a place, or 'holm', an island.  'Holm' could also mean a holly tree, from the Old English word 'holegn'.

Adams

This interesting surname is a patronymic of Adam, which is of English origin, and is from the Hebrew personal name "Adam", which was borne, according to Genesis, by the first man.  The name is of uncertain etymology; however, it is often said to be from the Hebrew "adama", earth.  It was very popular as a given name among non-Jews throughout Europe in the Middle Ages.

Geal

This unusual and interesting name is a dialectical variant of the pre 10th century biblical given name Julian or Julius, which was borne by a number of early saints.  The derivation is from the Latin "Iulianus", meaning hairy or downy, and was originally a Roman Clan name for a tribal family renowned for their long, flowing, locks, of which Julius Caesar was a member.  The name was probably introduced into England by the French after the 1066 Norman Invasion, or perhaps by the later Crusaders on their return from the Holy Land.  In medieval times the name was a Christian name in the same form by women, hence the modern girls' name Gillian.  In the modern surnames the spellings include Jell, Geal, Gell, and Gelle.

Saunders

This famous surname of either English or Greek derivation has truly ancient origins.  The name in its various spellings has long been accepted as being a derivative of the Greek personal name 'Alexander' which was recorded from 2000 B.C., but it is now certain that for many name holders, the origin is Olde English and locational from Sanderstead in Surrey.  This latter place was recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles of the year 871 as 'Sondenstede' - the house on the sandy land.  The Grecian 'Alexander' translates as "Defender of Men", a meaning which contributed greatly to its world wide popularity.  'Alexander' was introduced into England by the Crusaders, who, as the Knights of St. John, used the island of Crete as their base for the many fruitless attempts to conquer the Holy Land.  The known forms of the name are Saunder, Sandar, and Sander, whilst Saunders, Sanders, and Sandars, are patronymics.

Dovey

This unusual and interesting name is of Irish and Scots origin and also appears as Duffy or O' Duffy in Ireland. The Irish Gaelic form is 'O Dubhthaigh' which means "descendant of Dubhthach", a byname derived from "dubh", meaning black. The name was borne by a 6th Century saint who was Archbishop of Armagh. The Scots Gaelic form is "Mac Dhuibhshithe", son of Dubhshith, a personal name composed of the element "dubh", with the same meaning as the Irish version in the modern idiom the variants include Duffie, Dowey, Dowie, Do(v)ey, Duthy, McDuffie, McFee. The name is common in Angus.

Whyler

Recorded in several spellings including Wheeler, the usual spelling, and Wheeller, Wheler, Whealler, Whealer, Wayler, Whyler, and Whaler, this famous surname is English. It is occupational and in former times described a master wheel-maker or wheelwright. The derivation is from the pre 7th century Olde English word "hweogol" or "hweol", meaning a wheel. Wheels were used in spinning and other manufacturing processes, as well as for vehicles, so the wheelwright held an important position in medieval England.

Vickers

This interesting surname, with variant spellings Vicars, Viccars and Vickars, has two possible origins.  Firstly, it may be a patronymic surname for the "son of a vicar", deriving from the Middle English "vicare", plus the possessive ending "s".  Vicare was originally used to denote someone who carried out pastoral duties on behalf of the absentee holder of a benefice, and later became a regular word for a parish priest because in practice most benefice-holders were absentees.  The final "s" however may also mean "servant of", and would therefore be an occupational surname for one who worked for a vicar.  The surname was first recorded in the early half of the 14th Century.

Fitzgerald

This is an Anglo Norman French patronymic i.e., 'the son of Gerald'.  The Anglo\Norman\French prefix 'fi(t)z' indicates 'son of', plus the personal name Gerald, a compound of the elements 'geri' a spear and 'wald', rule.  There are over thirteen thousand name bearers in Ireland, the name having been introduced at the time of the Anglo-Norman Invasion i.e., 1170.

Whiteway

This is a locational name from Whiteway Barton in Devon. Whiteway is a compound of the Olde English pre 7th Century "huit" meaning "white and weg" - a track. ("Barton" translates as the big farm").  The name was originally given to one resident in this place or to a "dweller by the chalk road".

Kilpatrick

This is an interesting name of Scottish and Irish origin. In the instance of the Scottish name, it is locational from either of two places so called, one in Closeburn, Dumfreisshire, and the other in East and West Kilpatrick, Dumbarton.  It is recorded in the Episcopal Register, Glasgow in 1468 that one Thomas de Kylpatrik, was Rector of Suthek, and in Bain's Scottish documents one Nigel Kilpatrick was a prisoner of war in Kenilworth Castle in 1302.  The Irish name in Gaelic is MacGiolla Phadraig, meaning son, servant or devotees of St. Patrick.  They were sometimes known as (Mac) Gilpatrick, (Mac) Kilpatrick, or McLlpatrick, but are generally known as Fitzpatrick, the only name with this prefix which is of native Irish origin, the others being Norman.

Castley

This is a locational name from the small ancient village of Castley located on the North bank of the river Wharfe in the parish of Leathley, West Yorkshire, England.

Thomson

This famous surname is regarded as being of "Crusader" origins, and found in every European country.  That is to say it is a name associated with the Christian Faith, and one whose popularity followed the twelve Crusades by the knights of St John, under the command of various European kings in particular Richard, Coeur de Lyon, of England, to free the Holy Land from the Muslim.  All the Crusades were unusuccessful, but it was not for want of gallantry, on either side.  Returning knights, as a reminder of their efforts, gave their children names associated with the Bible. One of the most popular was Thomas.  This was an Aramaic byname meaning "twin", and borne by one of Christ's disciples.  Prior to the Crusades the name Thomas was found only as a priest name, but thereafter became one of the most popular male personal names, generating a wide variety of surnames.  The patronymic forms from diminutives, such as Thomson (the Scottish form) and Thompson, found mainly in England and Northern Ireland, appear firstly in the 14th Century, the first recording being from Scotland.  The intrusive "p" of the English and Irish forms was for easier pronunciation, and the wild fable about "p" meaning prisoner, is total rubbish.  If "p" did imply prisoner, every name would have one! One of the earliest recordings is that of John Thompson in the charters of the Abbey of Whitby, Yorkshire, in 1349, whilst amongst the early church recordings is the marriage of David Thompson and Mary Clarke on May 29th 1664 at St. Giles Cripplegate, in the city of London.  The first recorded spelling of the family name in any spelling is believed to be that of John Thomson, which was dated 1318, in the Annals of Scotland.  This was during the reign of King Robert 1st of Scotland, known as "The Bruce", 1306 - 1329.  Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop", often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Scottish Family Christian naming convention

The following tables are useful in trying to identify precedents of the 18th and early 19th century.  The naming convention appears to have been followed by James Harvie (1790-1860) and less so by James Harvey (1826 – 1900).

Alternatively:

1st Son named after Fathers Father

1st Daughter named after Mothers Mother

2nd Son named after Mothers Father

2nd Daughter named after Fathers Mother

3rd Son named after Father

3rd Daughter named after Mother

4th Son named after Father's oldest brother

4th Daughter named after Mothers oldest sister

5th Son named after 2nd oldest brother or mother's oldest brother  

5th Daughter named after 2nd oldest sister or Fathers oldest sister

James Harvey

James Harvey and Jane Smellie (1st wife) and Janet Brownlee (2nd wife), Townshead, Parish of Cambusnethan or Westbury, Tasmania

First Family

CHILDRENS NAME

SCOTTISH NAMING PATTERN

The name of the forebear

James (b 1855)

1st Son - Father’s father

James Harvie (b 1790)

Alexander (b 1856)

2nd Son – Mother’s father

Alexander Smellie

Mary (b 1858)

1st Daughter – Mother’s mother

Mary Smellie

 Second Family

CHILDRENS NAME

SCOTTISH NAMING PATTERN

The name of the forebear

John

3rd Son – (Father) but 1st by Janet, so Mother’s Father

John Harvie (paternal great grandfather)

Thomas (b 1856)

4th Son (Father’s oldest brother (John) –but 2nd by Janet so Mother’s father

Thomas Brownlee (b 1801)

Norman

5th Son – Father but 3rd by Janet

 

George

6th Son – Father’s oldest brother but 4th by Janet

 

Elizabeth (b 1860)

2nd Daughter– Mother’s mother but 1st by Janet 

Elizabeth (Brownlee)

Jane

3rd Daughter– Father’s mother but 2nd by Janet

Jane Tudhop

Janet

4th Daughter – mother, but 3rd by Janet

Janet Brownlee

Mary

5th Daughter – mother’s oldest sister but 4th by Janet

 

 James Harvie and Jean Tudhop – Meadowbank, Parish of Dalziel 

CHILDRENS NAME

SCOTTISH NAMING PATTERN

The name of the forebear

John b 1819

1st Son - Father’s father

John Harvie

James b 1826

2nd Son – Mother’s father

James Tutop

 

3rd Son – Father

 

 

4th Son – Father’s oldest brother

 

 

5th Son – Father’s 2nd oldest brother or Mother’s oldest brother

 

Mary (used twice)

1st Daughter – Mother’s mother

Mary Thomson

Janet (used twice)

2nd Daughter – Father’s mother

Jane Gibb

Jane

3rd Daughter - mother

Jean Tutop

Isobella b 1834

4th Daughter – mother’s oldest sister

Isobell Tutop (b 1774)

 John Harvie & Jane Gibbs - Topenhill and Bowmanhirst, Parish of Carluke 

CHILDRENS NAME

SCOTTISH NAMING PATTERN

The name of the forebear

William

1st Son - Father’s father

William Harvie?

James

2nd Son – Mother’s father

Robert Gibbs

 

3rd Son – Father

 

Mary

1st Daughter – Mother’s mother

Mary Weir

Isobel

2nd Daughter – Father’s mother

Isobel Reston?

 

3rd Daughter - mother

 

 James Tutop & Mary Thomson of Hutchland, Parish of Lesmahagow

Married 7th April 1769

CHILDRENS NAME & born

SCOTTISH NAMING PATTERN

The name of the forebear

George

1770

1st Son - Father’s father

George Tutop

 

 

2nd Son – Mother’s father

John Thomson

Isobell

1774

1st Daughter – Mother’s mother

Isobel Pait (b 1720)

Jean

1778

2nd Daughter – Father’s mother

Jean?

 

3rd Daughter - mother

 

 William Harvie & Isobell Reston – married 1732 in Rutherglen, Lanark

CHILDRENS NAME

SCOTTISH NAMING PATTERN

The name of the forebear

John Harvie (b 1735)

1st Son - Father’s father

John Harvie (b 1707 or 1712)

Walter Harvie (b 1736)

2nd Son – Mother’s father

Walter Reston

 George Tutop and Jean ?

CHILDRENS NAME

SCOTTISH NAMING PATTERN

The name of the forebear

James

1st Son - Father’s father

James Tutop?

 

2nd Son – Mother’s father

 

Isobell

1st Daughter – Mother’s mother

 

Jean

2nd Daughter – Father’s mother

 

 

3rd Daughter - mother

 

For more in formation: www.surnamedb.com